Quick Cotton Bowl Remnants


· TV Tan Line has a collection of Cotton Bowl screenshots like the one above that you can peruse at your convenience. HT – Da Wiz

· Auburn blog From the Bleachers has a Cotton Bowl postgame report. Apparently Will doesn’t care much for Nebraska.

“I’ve never much cared for Nebraska. In the ’80’s, the Cornhuskers played a big role in creating the current media-darling “powerhouse” mold: play in a weak conference, run up the score on outmanned opponents, only play one or two real games a year, and rack up the accolades from a press corps that only sees the box scores (or today, ESPN highlights) from most games. Sure, there were occasions when Nebraska was every bit as good as their billing–just ask Steve Spurrier–but there were at least as many years when the Children of the Corn were exposed as ridiculously overrated during bowl season. Like, say, 1983.”

Finally, this has no direct connection to the Cotton Bowl, but it is worth the read nonetheless. Chris from Smart Football has a new piece up relating playcalling in football to a game of Rock-Paper-Scissors. He makes some great points and I wish he updated the site more frequently as it is a veritable treasure trove of information.

“Playcalling, at least oversimplified, is a lot like matching pennies, or–for a more common game–rock-paper-scissors. If I choose rock and you choose scissors, I get a first down. If I choose rock and you choose rock, I maybe gain a couple yards. If I choose rock and you choose paper–whoops, I just got sacked and maybe fumbled too.

A lot of football games come down to who has the bigger rocks and scissors (more talent), but tough, highly competitive games really do come down to whether you picked paper vs. his rock or vs. his scissors. But how many supposedly great calls were just luck? Probably a lot. We try to make educated guesses, but there’s something to be said for going random.”

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